North America’s Largest Ancient MISSING CITY Located! #GoXplrr Hutton Pulitzer

Missing Link? Mississippi Floods, and a Great City Disappears

Missing cities are not just for Europe, South America or even the Middle East and a recent find has proven even North America hides missing and lost cities!

cahokia-first-city

CahokiaMounds-old

The mysterious abandonment of one of North America’s first big cities may be linked to a massive Mississippi River flood 800 years ago, a new study finds.

In the bottom of an oxbow lake next to Cahokia, Ill., which was the most powerful and populous city north of Mexico in A.D. 1200, lie the buried remains of a flood that likely destroyed the crops and houses of more than 15,000 people. Researchers investigating pollen records of Cahokia’s farming and deforestation discovered distinctive evidence of the flood: a silty layer 7.5 inches (19 centimeters) thick. The silt is dated to A.D. 1200, plus or minus 80 years, said Samuel Munoz, lead study author and a geographer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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The city wasn’t completely abandoned until A.D. 1350, but the catastrophic flood could have shaken the confidence of the town, sited near modern-day St. Louis, Munoz said.

“I think the relationships between flooding and the decision to abandon the settlement are pretty complicated, but it’s surprising and exciting to discover this flood happened right in the middle of a key turning point in Cahokia’s history,” Munoz said.

At its height, Cahokia sprawled over an area of about 6 square miles (16 square kilometers). Similar to modern-day New York City, Cahokia was an artistic and cultural center, where people brought in raw materials from across North America, and residents transformed them into exquisite goods.

Vast agricultural fields — where farmers grew crops such as corn, squash, sunflower, little barley and lambs quarters — surrounded the city. More than 200 earthen mounds rose from the city, many of which still loom over the landscape today.

READ THE REST OF THE STORY ABOUT THIS FIND HERE

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