Bronze Age Burial, Where Men Became Gods, Ancient Mayan and Chinese Contact? w/ #JovanHuttonPulitzer #TheHistoryHeretic

A Bronze Age Burial Steeped in Legend: What Makes the Ship-Shaped Tjelvar’s Grave Unique

Gotland, Sweden’s largest island, is home to medieval churches, cathedral ruins, as well as numerous pre-historic sites. The archaeological and historical sites that pepper this land make up a timeline of Gotland’s past. One such site is known as Tjelvar’s grave. It is a ship-shaped stone setting found on the eastern coast of the island. Sites of this type can be found all over Scandinavia, they are typically dated to the early Viking Age, circa the late 8th century AD.

However, Tjelvar’s grave can be dated all the way back to the Bronze Age, predating the other sites by nearly 2000 years. From the Bronze Age to the Viking Age, to our present age, this style has been resurrected and replicas continue to be built around Gotland and Scandinavia.

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Where Men Become Gods

Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings , a television special, took an hour long look at the great city, its inhabitants, and the excavation of the Temple of Quetzalcoatl, (also known as the Feathered Serpent Pyramid.) The program revealed evidence of advanced engineering built into a tunnel system, and placed directly underneath the Pyramid. As a team excavated the tunnels, viewers witnessed what must be considered the interior of an ancient generator, where combinations of chemical, mineral, water (and possible electromagnetic fields) were introduced into chambers, resulting in some form of energy.

How and where this energy was delivered is still unknown, but based on the design of the complex, we can now speculate as to how the entire facility may have operated. (Note that I have purposely called Teotihuacan a facility, as this is exactly what it was and not a city as many have speculated. Here’s their amazing discovery.

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Mayan Calendar Similar to Ancient Chinese: Early Contact?

Ancient Mayan and Chinese calendar systems share so many similarities, it is unlikely they developed independently, according to the late David H. Kelley, whose paper on the subject was published posthumously in August.

Kelley was a Harvard-educated archaeologist and epigrapher at the University of Calgary in Canada. He earned fame in the 1960s for major contributions toward deciphering the Mayan script. His article, titled “Asian Components in the Invention of the Mayan Calendar,” was written 30 years ago, but was only recently unearthed and published for the first time in the  journal Pre-Columbiana .

In 1980, a major science journal had solicited the article, said Pre-Columbiana’s editor Dr. Stephen Jett. But, Jett said, “the editors rejected it as being overly documented for the journal’s spare format; understandably for so revolutionary an effort, Dave did not wish to weaken the documentation, and he never published the piece elsewhere.” Jett obtained Kelley’s permission to publish it before he died.

They hypothesis Kelly presented is controversial. He said that the calendars indicate contact between Eurasia and Mesoamerica more than 1,000 years ago, contradicting mainstream archaeology’s understanding that such contact occurred for the first time only a few hundred years ago.

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